Friday, March 18, 2011

Welcome to Opinionator Readers

To all the readers of the New York Times Opinionator website, welcome. I hope you'll take the time to go back through my postings since my tour to Iraq in 2005. You'll find some personal rants, battlefield reports and general musings from my time in both the studio and out in combat.

9 comments:

sarahru said...

Your work have so moved me. Seeing these wounded soldiers through charcoal sketches allowed me to really look and see their bodies and pain in a way that color photographs have not. Thank you.

Monsieur Zenith said...

Dear Sir, thank you for the wonderful work you do telling the stories that would otherwise be lost in personal memories and washed away by time. i hope that, when you have collected enough material, that you will be able to render your collected work in print. i look forward to reading your next installment(s). Sincerely, Vonbek

Anonymous said...

Thank you is not enough... Everyone should read the New York Times piece! Humanity is a beautiful thing and you brought it to life in such a touching, amazing way.

Robert Bates said...

Your stuff is amazing Mike. You are doing the kind of things with your talent that I hope to one day achieve.

Elize McKelvey said...

Mike!

I have had like 10 people foward me your article, it's awesome! They are like "isn't that the guy you talked to on the phone with" I was like yeaa, and Donna Neary! So great. :)

kat said...

Thank you for this series. My late husband was severely disabled, not from combat, but from anoxia caused by sudden cardiac arrest. It is difficult for me to read your words since my family was a part of what you write about for many years. I say "was", when in truth, it always "is." Thank you for bringing the inner world of the disabled out into the light. It has been too long in the shadows.

Anonymous said...

michael, i spent a year in 1970-71 in vietnam as an army orthopedic surgeon - while it wasnt the most active combat year we did see enuf major injuries to be impacted for a lifetime-i have struggled with thoughts about what eventually happened to patients with multitrauma war injuries/multiple amputations/facial injuries, etc.-for sure you hardly see them as part of normal society-my suspicion is they are "isolated" and struggle on the periphery depending on an inefficient v.a. system-the current nyt series re your art brings these thoughts to the surface for me-no need to tell you how important this article is-is it possible to purchase any of your illustrations or paintings-thank you
atjcbarry@aol.com

Anonymous said...

michael, i spent a year in 1970-71 in vietnam as an army orthopedic surgeon - while it wasnt the most active combat year we did see enuf major injuries to be impacted for a lifetime-i have struggled with thoughts about what eventually happened to patients with multitrauma war injuries/multiple amputations/facial injuries, etc.-for sure you hardly see them as part of normal society-my suspicion is they are "isolated" and struggle on the periphery depending on an inefficient v.a. system-the current nyt series re your art brings these thoughts to the surface for me-no need to tell you how important this article is-is it possible to purchase any of your illustrations or paintings-thank you
atjcbarry@aol.com

gary said...

Thank you for the WOunded Warrior project. I am a disabled old man and I hate the fact that we keep turning out disabled young men. I much admire the dignity you allowed to show through, the strength and the courage. These men showed great courage in their war, but they will need as much or more now.

I am not a Marine, I will never be a Marine, but I hope I can get away with saying Semper Fi.

I look forward to more of your work